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possibility of a civil war in ukraine and that borders russia. towns were overrun by armed separatists who believe those towns should be russians. this is happening not on the border but more than 150 miles into ukraine. it's after midnight in ukraine now. government leaders are promising that active military operations will continue when the sun comes up. dozens of civilians and separatists have been killed in the fighting so far and people who live in the region are being told to stay in their homes for safety. as i said a minute ago a team of military monitors from the osce was taken hostage more than a week ago but they are now free. they were held against their will by ukrainian separatists who are trying to take over their cities and their towns. on the phone with me now is michael bossercue. a spokesman for the organization of safety and cooperation in europe. thank you for joining us. the condition of your colleagues who were released today, were any of them hurt? >> hi don. thank you for asking. of course, we are delighted that they are free and they are fine. they are actually on
is looming. i am talking about eastern ukraine. a part of the country that borders russia. these ukrainian soldiers are rolling through one of several towns overrun by armed separatists who believe the towns should be russian. this is not right on the border, it is happening more than 150 miles into ukraine. dozens of people have been killed and people who live there are basically hiding out in their own homes. meanwhile, a team of international military observers that were held hostage more than a week by the pro-russian forces are now free. cnn's arwa damon is in eastern ukraine. >> reporter: that 12 member osce team finally freed, they had been taken hostage april 25th, accused by the self proclaimed mayor of being nato spies. on their release, he referred to them as guests. they appeared to be tired, but said they had been treated fairly well. the german foreign minister thanking the efforts of russian envoy and ensuring their release. the number two for the osce commission saying this is an example of how important negotiations are. but elsewhere throughout the country, we're seeing v
people were hurt yesterday. russia's president vladimir putin is blaming the surge in violence on ukraine and the west as well. it's putting new pressure on the white house to find a way to force russia to withdraw. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house with more this afternoon. kristen, first of all, what are president obama's options here? >> well, he doesn't have a whole lot of options, craig. the president has been quite clear that a military option is off the table. so right now the u.s. and its european partners are focusing on sanctions. they have so far implemented several rounds of sanctions, which have largely been targeted at individuals. on friday, president obama met with german chancellor angela merkel here at the white house, and the two made a pretty big announcement, which is that they had agreed to move forward with sectorial sanctions, if the crisis in ukraine worsens after the may 25th election. so i don't anticipate that we'll see any new sanctions prior to that. then a final decision will be based on what is actually happening in ukraine. this is sig
. fredricka. >> nick paton-walsh, thanks so much. this violence comes a few weeks after ukraine and russia and western countries reached a peace deal. now russia says the deal is dead. the spokes man for vladimir putin said the military movement is the last nail in the coffin. matthew chance is joining us from moscow. matthew, it is hard to tell what putin is doing to use the violence to push the deal out the window. what is happening here? >> reporter: actually, within the past few minutes, a statement issued by the foreign ministry which lavrov, the foreign minister said, look, the geneva agreement is the best way of deescalating the situation in eastern ukraine. a phone conversation with kerry and lavrov. he called on the united states to use everything within its power to get the authorities to end the military operations in eastern ukraine. this comes after the terrible deaths that took place in odessa. nearly 40 people killed. pro-russian supporters in a government building inside and torched by a pro-kiev supporters. that is not gone down well. the kremlin condemned the action. the
of people have been killed in violent street battles between supporters and opponents of russia in southern ukraine. we have the very latest from outside the white house this morning. she joins us now. good morning. >> jenna, good morning you to. the crisis in ukraine is growing worse by the day. friday was the deadliest in months. officials in the black seaport city of odesa tell nbc news that 42 people were killed when riots broke out between pro russian and pro kiev protesters, moef died after being trapped in a burning building. now there were reports of more fierce fighting to day in the eastern part of the country. the one piece of good news here is that pro russian insurgents in eastern ukraine released the seven military observers and five ukrainian assistants who had been held captain ive for a week. all this comes as president obama and the german chancellor held a meeting on friday and issued a stern warning to moscow. they would move forward with sector sectoral sanctions which are the sanctions against broad sectors of russia's economy if they interfere with the may 25th electi
, new and deadly battles in ukraine and the u.s. delivers another warning to russia. a live report ahead. >>> the woman at the center of the donald sterling debacle now says he is not a racist. the role she's playing in his life today. >>> what led to one woman's gutt feeling that in the end prevented a teen's potential gun mele and massacre. the backstory behind her 911 call. >>> it's called the most exciting two minutes in sports. the kentucky derby. dylan dreyer reports on america's biggest horse race set to run in just hours. >>> and good morning, everyone. welcome to weekends with alex bit. witt. i'm richard lui. the deadliest day in months in the ukraine. at least 42 are dead as protests broke out. pro russian separatists and government supporters clashed in the streets and threw firebombs and stones as riot police attempted to suppress the flairup. in a statement this morning a spokesman for russian president vladimir putin claimed that the new government in kiev was a direct participant in the violence in odessa. there was some good news today that pro russian separatists have re
ukrainian soldiers dead. president obama promising even tough iter sanctions against russia. looks like a scene straight out of the movie. two men wearing business suits and fake were wigs. sprayed several esm employees and shocking one many times. no one was seriously thursday there. the robbers are still on the loose. no word on how much money they got away with. ivanka trump knows who she would like to see in the white house. her father. she told greta van susteren, trump would make a fabulous president because of his viewpoints and because of the fact that he listens and cares about people. >> as an american, i would love him to run for president. he is incredibly smart, incredibly knowledgeable. he has had tremendous experiences which would prepare him for the challenge. as a daughter, it's more complicated, obviously. it's a very tough life afternoon the political one is a challenge. >> well, we have been asking mr. trump if he is running but he keeps telling us, we will see what happens. >> and ben affleck may be great at run aring a gambling racket in the movies like this. >> wh
the standoff between the country's military and pro-russia activists has taken an even more violent turn in recent weeks. the interior minister says it's offensive to drive out what it calls terrorists from slovyansk. on friday, at least nine people were killed, including the pilots of two helicopters shot down by pro-russia separatists. the violence has spread to the southern port city of odessa as well. you're seeing some of the images into us from there. activists who support the government in kiev slashed with pro-russia supporters. a fire at a trade union building, that's what you're looking at now, killed at least 31 people. and we have these new developments into cnn. a team of military observers from the organization for security and cooperation in europe, the osce, they've been held captive in eastern ukraine for more than a week. well, there are reports now that they have been freed. pro-russia separatists accuse them of being nato spies. senior international correspondent nick paton walsh is near slovyansk. he joins us on the phone now and can speak to us. nick, tell us, what'
.s. and its european allies has really become a conflict with russia is resonating in several directions. some of that was on display today at the white house. where president obama and german chancellor angela merkel endeavored to present a united front, punishment if russia does not disengage. >> if it continues to destabilize, eastern ukraine and disrupt this month's presidential election we will move quickly on additional steps. including further sanctions that will impose greater cost but that's a choice facing the russian leadership. gwen: some of the fallout is affecting how americans view their second term president. in the latest "wall street journal"/nbc news poll, nearly half of those surveyed say that the u.s. should be less active in world affairs. and approval of the president's handling of foreign policy has dropped to its lowest point ever. so what did the white house do this week to speak to that? alexis? >> so the president and the administration started the week by talking about another round of tough sanctions. most of the sanctions that started the week that the administra
of unilateral energy supplies and gas delivery from russia. the transatlantic mentorship also offers great opportunities. we are duty bound to make global financial systems more resilient particularly in the g 20. we have made great headway. there are a number of areas where we still have considerable need for further reform. i am much interested in seeing regulation, bout on the shadow banking sector. we need to also do more on regulations where we see to it that any financial institution that gets into difficulties and irrespective of its size can actually be [inaudible] without taxpayer money. you have made enormous strides here and we have made some progress. this needs to be continued. all of these foreign and security policy challenges can only be mastered if we act together. the transatlantic partnership is and remains also in future the crucial key to peace, freedom, security, and prosperity for all of us. it is particularly in this year, 2014, that we are more than aware of this fact. 100 years after the beginning of the first world war, 75 years after the beginning of the second
when it comes to sanctions against russia. >> the goal is not to punish russia. the goal is to give them an incentive to choose the better course. that is to resolve these issues diplomatically. we are reunited on that front. leaders pointed to the ukraine elections as the next trigger point in determining whether stations were be expanded. says --hase the projection reflects a continued challenging environment and lower client activity levels. those are the top headlines at this hour. >> i want to get insight on today's jobs report. joining me now is >> from our studios in new york, this is "charlie rose." is bricklin dwyer. and janet elkin. great to have you here. let's start with you. from the jobsaway report? >> it is a mixed blessing. --saw a pop and play roles payrolls. generally that is a good thing. looking at the details, in the u.s. we had multiple payrolls. multiple jobs numbers. some numbers were less supportive of a stark rebound. >> what kind of details? the number of people actually in the labor force? >> exactly. but we look at is when people are confident, they've r
ukrainian helicopters. coming up, we'll look at whether an all-out war between russia and ukraine is inevitable and how the markets and the west could respond to the increased tensions. >> and then he cancelled on us yesterday at the last minute with no reason given, but boxing champ floyd mayweather has promised to come back with us today, so will he step into the ring with us, and especially with sarah who boxes, by the way. >> i would never go up against lloyd. >> he'll tell us why he wants to buy the l.a. clippers from donald sterling who has been banned, as we know, for life, and mayweather says sterling is a friend of his so there's a good chance, really good chance for a good interview with floyd mayweather jr. coming up this hour. stay tuned. stay tuned. and guaranteed one-second trades. and at the center of it all is a surprisingly low price -- just $7.95. in fact, fidelity gives you lower trade commissions than schwab, td ameritrade, and e-trade. i'm monica santiago of fidelity investments, and low fees and commissions are another reason serious investors are choosing fi
. words were flying and we heard the french ambassador to the when referring to russia as a pyromaniac firefighter. he calls the ambassador and amateur james bond who drinks vodka. were very upset. there was the russians who called for this meeting. --was because of the hiring firing down of two helicopters with ukrainian troops in them. russians had said that any action by the government against the pro-russian separatists is a declaration and escalation that might prompt russia to bring in peacekeeping troops. we had the russians making their point of view clear and we saw and britishench ambassadors each responding very strongly saying there is no way that the separate test -- separatists are doing what they're doing without support from the russians. the meeting -- we had the u.n. secretary-general going back to kiev next week and calling for the release of the monitors. >> what is the next step for the united states? >> we have a sense at the white lawn on the rose garden when we heard president obama and angela merkel talking about may 25. that key date when ukraine this post abo
significant support from russia. >> we'll discuss whether the two leaders with forge a united front in the face of russian aggression and auto renewed violence in ukraine. later, we'll dive into today's headline grabbing jobs report and why good news sounds so much like bad news for the gop. and melissa harris perry, msnbc's own, will be right here with us to discuss the plight of some 200 kidnapped school girls in nigeria. there were protests in new york today near the u.n., and we'll have more on that and what, if anything, the u.s. is doing to help. but we start with that joint news conference in front of the white house rose garden where president obama began with the jobs numbers and a few words on a devastating landslide and in afghanistan. both he and german chancellor angela merkel have tough questions on whether they can reach an agreement on stronger sakes against russia and whether they can bridge the divide between the u.s. and germany on nsa surveillance. president obama also faced a question from the international press about tuesday's botched oklahoma execution. on uk
to discuss tougher sanctions against russia over issues with ukraine. chancellor merkel is viewed as a pivotal figure in the standoff. >>> and a rockford, ohio, teen gives his great-grandmother the gift of a lifetime. austin dennison took his great-grandmother delores to his senior prom because she never got to go when she was in high school. this is great home video. start crying now, savannah. the two slow dancing together while the others looked on. an incredible gesture there. the night started with dinner at bob evans, one of her favorite places to go eat. the two, get this, they were home by 9:00 p.m. >> that's my dream night right there. >> just what her father said. better be home by 9:00. >> what a sweetheart. i just love that. what a great young man. he should be applauded. >> good man. >> not to mention he probably won all the girls after that. total ploy for the girls. >> should we turn to carson for the weather. >> no problem. let's check out the weather. >> exactly. there he goes. >> i don't know where to go. >> we have al roker, he's at churchill downs in louisville
, it is no surprise they are opposing sanctions against russia. the german corporate lobby is very strong. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we
they will discuss more economic sanctions on russia but at some point the real question is whether tightening the screws on a major trading partner ceases to be in the interest of the german government. >> joe, a bit of a turn. another problem, really one that's plagued the administration for quite some time now. i want to get your take on. new criticism coming at the administration for their handling on the violence in benghazi, the deadly events in benghazi. this e-mail from ben rhodes that came out, is it really a smoking gun as is being described by republicans or is this just more -- is this politicking as this issue has become a bit of a political football ahead of the midterms? >> well, it's a question of optics, kate. also a question of putting the obama administration back on defense with house republicans exploiting those newly disclosed documents that suggests the white house may have misled the public about the attack in benghazi that killed a u.s. ambassador. this all had quieted down but now sort of brought back into the limelight after the non-profit group judicial watch uncove
this morning that u.s. sanctions over ukraine are having a limited impact on russia as vladimir putin demand troops withdraw from part of the country. the russian ruble and stock market are actually stronger now than they were before the first wave of u.s. sanctions were announced. >> that's not really the idea. >> meanwhile, an operation is underway in eastern ukraine to reclaim the city controlled by pro-russian militants. gunfire and explosions could be heard as ukrainian forces claim they regained control of at least nine check points. the militants shot down two military helicopters. at least three people have been killed including a ukrainian pilot. separatists loyal to moscow are building barricades in an attempt to keep ukrainian forces away. it has been a violent week in the region with pro-russian militants seizing control of government buildings. yesterday the men overpowered to storm a building. they are fighting. >> they are fighting. you know it's not a good sign when vladimir putin tells you to withdraw troops from your own country. and the sanctions are having unfortunately l
calling for broader, tougher sanctions to punish russia for the interference in ukraine. the civil war in south sudan is on the verge of famine. the united nations official warned today more than one million people fled the violence at the start of crucial planting season. she said she's appalled neither of the two warring leaders seems concerned by the looming disaster. violence overshadows election day in iraq as people headed to the polls today to cast ballots in parliamentary elections. at least five people died in independent attacks. jonathan rugman filed this report. >> reporter: it's the kind of democracy saddam hussein would have never allowed. but in a country now racked by sectarian violence, iraq goferred for eight years by nouri al maliki from the shia majority, a man who rarely smiles. he voted early today casting this election as a referendum on his war against terror. >> i wish to see a huge turnout. god willing, we'll celebrate the success of this election and defeat terrorism and those who bet the election would be postponed. >> reporter: in parts of anbar province th
. at the same time we see a country whose greatest threat to that occurring is russia, a country that as we know, illegally went into crimea and annexed it, a country that today has 40,000 troops on the border, a country that has black ops operators inside eastern ukraine, the industrial part of ukraine, that it hopes over time to in essence become a part of what they're doing in russia. we see every day the destabilization occurring and we know the most important next step in ukraine is for them to go to this may 25 election and have an election the world community believes was a valid election. and yet we know daily putin and russia does everything it can to destabilize ukraine and to delegitimize this process of elections and moving forward. so, mr. president, a number of us, out of grave concern for what is happening, out of concern about where this is going to lead america, where this is going to lead europe, have come together to write a piece of legislation because what we've seen from the administration is a lot of rhetoric. unfortunately, mr. president, what we see is an administration
there is no way to stop the unrest in two eastern regions bordering russia. he says police and security pless," and are in some cases cooperating with pro-russian government who have seized buildings and taking people hostage. vice president joe biden reassure the prime minister of ofvia that in the face russian assertiveness in ukraine the united states is committed to the collective defense of nato allies. mr. biden met with latvian prime minister at the white house yesterday and today the vice president speaks at the atlantic council on the situation in ukraine. here the remarks later today on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. everybody says how do you think these women came from such a very low part of the world? so victorian era is stratified. there was the very rich and the middle class and then the real robber baron achievers. the life and times of these women is the most buccaneer time you can think of. after the civil war. finances were becoming major, yet rockefeller, jim fest, all of the robber barons were making a lot of money. i think it was e
russia. beyond education, how do you get people to trust this thing in the way that sovereign countries have not? a leading engineering institution, m.i.t. is the king of practicality. that is part of the spearman. seeing what real-world applications we can build that people will end up trusting. >> such as? >> there is a number of things we can do that would be very important. for example, you could build a decentralized kick starter for crowd funding. you could build a micro-payment solution which would be approved for news media in terms of online newspapers. having a solution for their content. >> i'm curious, have any professors at m.i.t. torn you to shreds on this? do they look at the theory of bitcoin and forget about the efficiency and say the bitcoin club has got it wrong? say that most professors are pretty excited ingut this project and see where it goes. there are plenty professors who have questions about it. most of the questions tend to come from the economic side. people understand the code and technical aspect of bitcoin and a pretty enthusiastic about it. >> jeremy and
. in 2010, north korea shelled a south korean island, leaving four dead. >> russia's biggest trading partner announcing bigger sanctions because of the ukraine crisis, e.u. saying there are tarts. the u.s. imposed sanctions against seven top russian officials linked to russian president vladimir putin. the u.s. saying it will freeze their assets and ban them from obtaining american visas. in ukraine, the division between those in favor of russia and those for a united ukraine are getting deeper. ukraine's parliament meeting in kiev over ongoing tensions in the eastern cities. we are in donetsk, ukraine. what is the reaction on the streets? do they think sanctions will change the reality on the ground? >> at the moment, there is not much reaction. i think it's irrelevant to what this region is going through at the moment. you won't see direct impact and many people don't understand what sanctions mean and how will it change what's happening here. yesterday with all impunity, gunman, the usual ones with their faces covered seized another local building. then there was these riots here in the c
is adding sanctions against 15 people no connection with russia's actions with ukraine. they include vladimir putin. russia is criticizing the move as well as sanctions from the u.s. they're vowing a painful response. the u.s. targeted seven officials. >>> today vice president biden will unveil a plan to combat the epidemic of sexual assaults on college campuses. it would require colleges to survey students for a better sense of how often assaults take place and provide a checklist for schools to re-examine sexual misconduct policies. the white house is launching a new website notalone.gov to publish enforcement data. those are your headlines at quarter past the hour. >>> let's take a break. when we come back on "new day," a piece of puzzle revealed for flight 370. the last radio communication between the cockpit and the control tower finally played to the families. we're going to get reactions this fr them and analysis from our team of experts. >>> nba just hours from announcing possibly repercussions for the l.a. clippers owner donald sterling. can his team be taken away from him?
in america are starting? the role for congress to turn the back for america. incursion,r russia's in nation, depending on who you ask, they tried to guarantee more loans to the country. there were some people who said that this is not a good idea, we are not going to get this money back, and tried to tap into that populist frustration across the country. rand paul is one of those people. he is positioning himself as the menu doesn't want to give american money away abroad. that it makes you an isolationist amanda does put him out of the mainstream of what the parties doing. guest: it's an interesting point that the caller raises. both congress and the white house avenue 2 jobs in terms of domestic policy and foreign policy, and the white house would certainly argue that it is very important that ukraine feel the support of the united states both in terms of the loan guarantee but also just support dealinge of the u.s. with the challenges that russia is creating. the questions about if congress to move quickly on that but not on employment insurance or these other issues are fair questions.
about the problem with the communist nation of russia which has illegally seized crimea and is now making incursions into the eastern area of ukraine? i just returned from a trip, mr. speaker, on sunday, visiting some former soviet block nations, to talk about their response to the aggressive, illegal actions of russia and what's happening, to reset the table in the former soviet block nations. these are nations that are very worried about what they're seeing. they're worried because they understand that you can trust a communist to be a communist and their actions today are a mere image of what their action were formerly. russia recognizes if no one pushes back, they will continue to salivate over more lands and more influence and seek to dominate more people. russia's responsible for enslaving millions of people. in fact, they even murdered tens of millions of their own people under stalin. this is the regime that needs to be washed. and unfortunately under our previous secretary of state, hillary clinton, she gave, in my opinion unwisely, the reset button to the former soviet --
're following here in "the situation room." the obama administration trying to send a clear message to russia by stepping up its sanctions against president vladimir putin's inner circle. the violence on the ground in ukraine is only worsening. more clashes in east after a deadly bombing earlier today. chief national security correspondent jim schiutto is monitoring the situation. whaps the latest? >> in making their case, administration officials have been frankly brutal h their rhetoric. they said russia has done, quote, precisely nothing to meet its obligations under the deal reached in geneva earlier this month intended to deescalateacc continuing to spark unrest. clearly it took some time, more time than expected to get sanctions together in rough agreement with europe. it's hard to distinguish them, in fact, from the earlier round of sanctions. administration officials say it's just one step of many. with the crisis in ukraine only growing more violent, today the obama administration introduced new economic sanctions it says are designed to punish russia for orchestrating it. the sancti
with russia. this highly exaggerated cost was assessed and report that is close to the public. constituents living in aiken and barnwell counties deserve to know the truth. i am glad they filed a freedom of information act request in pursuit of the cost analysis. we should be working together for environmental cleanup, for nonproliferation compliance and to support the savannah river site and its vital mission with dedicated employees. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from florida, ms. frankel, seek recognition? ms. frankel: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. frankel: mr. speaker, today on holocaust remembrance today, we solemnly reflect on the six million jews who were system @ically murdered by a mad man, known as hitler, and his nazi followers. we remember the children torn from the arms of their parents and they marche
, everyone. president obama announcing tough new sanctions on russia over the crisis in ukraine. nbc's peter alexander is in manila, philippines, where the president is wrapping up a week-long tour of asia. >> reporter: willie, good morning. those new sanctions will target vladimir putin's billionaire cronies and russian companies in what president obama described as a calibrated effort to change russia's behavior. president obama was welcomed here in the philippines today, the fourth and final stop in his weeklong asia tour. but it's the crisis in ukraine that keeps demanding the president's attention. >> we are keeping in reserve additional steps should the situation escalate further. >> reporter: in this region, u.s. officials signed a ten-year agreement to preposition fighter jets, ships and american troops at philippine bases. two decade after the u.s. controlled bases here were forced to shut down. after visiting troops here tomorrow, president obama will head back to washington. willie? >> all right, peter alexander in manila, thanks. >>> some new video out of south korea shows the ca
advocating that we begin hitting a breeze within russia to further destabilize the economy. their goal, russia's goal, inside the ukraine, is to destabilize the country and delegitimize elections that taking place on may 25. over time, he can achieve his goals without actually sending troops in. he has little green men, black , fomenting inside ukraine. people are not yet with putin. it is amazing. the only information that people are getting is from russia. it is only russian speaking news that is occurring. over time, continuing to do it is doing, he can do without actually sending people in. again, i think we need to put sectoral sanctions in place. i think we need to move those troops away from the border am a change behavior, and i am very concerned that as we have seen from this administration and some a tough issues, their policy is always late. after the point in time and we could've made a difference in the outcomes. senator bob corker speaking over the weekend. says the united states will levy new sanctions monday on russian individuals and companies in retaliation for moscow
is very concerned at how russia will respond to any use of force by these men. >> in the next town, a demonstration in favor of russia it's a small crowd although they do seem to have some support on the sidelines russians control room the buildings. they had an unexpected visito, once one of members of the jury before he fell out with vladimir putin, now trying to mediate. they call him a traitor and tell him to go away. in donetsk armed pro-russians took over the t.v. station. the ukrainian police, such unreliable allies of the government in kiev stood by and watched it happen. the largest crowds of the day were in the cemeteries. this is the day of the dead, when people go to meet their ancestors' spirits. nat natalia warns her dead relatives and wonders what they would make of all of this chaos >> translator: my relatives would be shocked if they could see what is happening. they would say: you have to fight for ukraine. my brother lives in russia, and i live here. i am afraid of war, and a war that my son will be taken into the army. >> she is part of the silent majority th
here. the ukrainian army was no match for russia's power. it's hard to see how there could be any resistence for russians to show up on their door step. >> how does the situation of those prisoners in slovensk, with the consideration of what is happening in kiev. >> reporter: i think those who have been held hostage, there has been no military operation held on the ground. shortly before that the government announced phase two of its anti-terror operation, but that was never implemented. the young men said boldly they're going keep as many hostages as they can as long as their town is surrounded by government forces who they say came to slaughter their town it is certainly a huge hiccup. it's not just about slovenesk, but there are other towns where they tried to take over the government buildings, they didn't succeed, but the people are angered and hardened, and you have that all over eastern ukraine at the moment. the reason there is no military operation is because of these who are held and any move by the government could put their lives in jeopardy. >> thank you very much. so
kerry, who again said more sanctions are coming down the pike if russia doesn't change its ways. guest: i think the u.s. government should do what he can within reason to try to deter the russian government -- what it can within reason to try to deter the russian government from interfering in the ukraine. there is an ancient lesson of foreign policy. there is such a thing as the balance of power. for country to maintain its independence, particularly if it is next door to a much more powerful nation, it either needs to muster the power itself to maintain its independence on its own or ally itself with others. ukraine is outside the scope of nato. we talked about poland earlier. poland is not. in the cold war, nato established the balance of power that, for decades, drew the line at the berlin wall. now the line has moved east into eastern europe. i don't think the united states has the means or interest perhaps the means, to use our power to establish a balance of power that protect the sovereignty of the ukraine from russia. ukraine needs to develop an ability to protect its own sove
in malaysia barack obama was thinking about crimea. he said russia should stop encouraging unrest in the east of ukraine, and there was brode support for sanctions to deter moscow. >> the motion that for us to go forward with sectorial sanctions would be the most effective deterrent. mr putin, i think, is factually wrong. we'll be in a stronger position to deter mr putin when he sees that the world is unified and the united states and europe is unified. >> inside ukraine, a team of negotiators is heading to the east. hoping to secure the release of their colleagues held by gunmen in slovyansk. the group of military observers have been detained since friday, as the leader of the pro-russian group suggests he would consider a prisoner swap. moscow would do norrees sanctions. the leader of a separatist group in the eastern city of slovyansk said me have detained three ukrainian intelligence officers. the me were captured in an overnight operation. russian media is reporting the group wanted to exchange the officers for separatists who are previously detained. hoda abdel-hamid joins me from donet
sees the world is unified. >> the u.s. president sends another warning to russia to stop meddling in the east of ukraine. >>> south korea's prime minister resigns following criticism of the government's handling of the ferry disaster. >>> south africans mark 20 years of democracy, the end of apartheid - but how much much has things really changed? >>> two of the leading catholic popes of the 20th century have been declared saints in rome. this is the scene live. let's have a look there. that's the vatican, st. peter's square in rome. pope francis declared pope john paul ii and pope john xxiii saints at a special mass, which is under way. there, in the midst of everything going on is our correspondent for al jazeera. jonah. >> reporter: they are now officially saints, john paul ii and st. john xxiii, pope francis proclaiming the two late popes as saints using these words "we declare and define blessed john xxiii and john paul ii be saints, we enrol them among the saints decreeing they be veperrated as such by the search. that was the moment that the faithful came to see, watching i
the meeting, thank you very much, indeed. >>> well, while in malaysia president obama said russia should stop encouraging unrest in the east of ukraine. he said there was broad support for more sanctions to deter moscow. >> the notion that for us to go forward with sanctions on our own without the europeans would be the most effective deterrent in putin i think is factually wrong. we're going to be in a stronger position to deter mr. putin when we're unified and the united states and europe are unified. >> well, in ukraine itself a team of european negotiators are heading to the east. they hope to secure the release of their colleague who is are being held by pro-russian groups. the lead of the pro-russian groups said he would consider a swap with prisoners in kiev. and facing further sanctions from seven of the world's richest countries, some of which could come in less than 24 hours. >>> to syria now which has until the end of sunday to hand over its remaining chemical weapon stock pile under the terms of an international deal. they will be destroyed on a ship in the mediterranean. the chem
back in the studio. ukraine. >> yeah. >> russia. where are we? >> it seems we're looking at a rolling dismemberment of ukraine. and i think it may turn out to be too strong a statement. i hope so. right now, the way the russians seem to be handling this is to challenge the authority of the ukrainian government and to warn that if they try to assert its authority in the eastern provinces where the support is weaker that russia will respond. respond they will, as the foreign minister said, as they did in georgia in 2008, the threat of war. >> they're threatening war if what happens? >> if there is an attempt to oust the pro-russian separatist groups that have taken over buildings and squares in eastern ukraine, in small cities and towns. >> which they intended to do. >> the ukrainian government has said a number of times that they want to do this. they have held back because they know the use of force may not be supported. it may not be successful. it delegitimized the previous government. president yanukovich killed so many people in february. >> he lost the support of everybody. even
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